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Archive for the ‘Missions’ Category

By Debbie B.

For the love of The Messiah compels us to reason this: The One died in the place of every person; so then every person died with him. 2 Corinthians 5:14 (Aramaic Bible in Plain English)

For the Love of Christ Compels Us

In May, 2017, a medical team from Richmond’s First Baptist Church traveled to the Middle East to serve the refugees from Syria. During the six days they were there, the team saw patients in dire conditions, suffering from significant physical and emotional pain. All of the refugees had been forced to leave their homes because of the brutal ISIS regime that had moved into what had been their towns. All had been traumatized, many were tortured, and some were forced to watch the murders of their family and friends. Panic and fear filled their days before they were able to leave.

For the Love of ChristBut as the team cared for the refugees and listened to their stories, they found many who were Christians with amazing stories of how they had survived the turmoil through their faith in Christ. Here are a few of the stories of the people they met and the holy moments they experienced that the team wanted to share with their FBC family.

For the Love of Christ Compels UsOne of the older women the team met, Hadhirah, fought off ISIS militants who came into her home to force the family to leave. They beat her with a board, and even today she still experiences tremors and is in constant pain. She was also forced to watch as the militants killed her son because he was a Christian. Hadhirah explained that when ISIS came into the village, they marked her home, as well as others who were Christians, with a sign indicating their belief in Christ. The sign also signaled that anyone could do anything to those in the house without recourse from ISIS. Above is the sign for “Christian” like the one placed on Hadhirah’s home. Interestingly, this is translated as “The Nazarene” in Arabic.

Nasir was another believer the team met. He had been tortured and beaten by ISIS militants as they forced their way into his home. During his ordeal, he focused on the words from Ephesians 6. Later, he decided to write the militants a letter, or poem, based on this scripture. Through the translator working with the team, a Christian, Nasir told them what he had written, which follows:

A Letter to ISIS – by Nasir

My place is with Jesus Christ.
If a fox thinks to approach me
he will find me protected in the Lion’s arm.
I will stand up and raise my head higher.
In Jesus Christ only is my salvation.
I will have no fear or slackness.
The Lord of my salvation is our stone (rock).
The Lord has filled me with righteousness.
He robed me with the breastplate of righteousness.
My feet are fitted with the readiness
that comes from the gospel of peace.

Faith is our shield of protection from the arrows of evil.
The helmet of salvation is a crown on my head.
God’s Word is a double-edged sword
that we defeat our enemy with.
Our brothers; we are always ready and awake
with prayers and fasting,

waiting for the day when the Lord will come on clouds.
We are ready.

For the Love of Christ Compels UsAlthough some on the team had medical training and went on the trip to care for the refugees’ medical needs, all felt compelled to go and share God’s love. As Mary Michael Lipford writes, “At first, I felt completely inadequate for the job. I was the youngest on the team with no medical background, no seminary training, and no knowledge of the Arabic language. This is where God came in; reaching out and calling the unequipped for His purpose. There I was, sharing the gospel while checking blood pressures and finger pricks. In 2 Samuel 7, God told David, ‘I took you from the pasture…to be ruler over my people Israel. I have been with you wherever you have gone.’ He took an inadequate shepherd boy and turned him into a king, and He calls each of us to do what may seem impossible by equipping us with tools for the job.”

For the Love of Christ Compels UsYour tithes and offerings helped cover the costs of Hadhirah’s and Nasir’s pain medicines, as well as medicine and care for many other Syrian refugees. Your gifts have taken good care of those you will most likely never meet. And, your gifts have provided for the love of God to be shared in the midst of suffering and pain. The medical team learned of many refugees of other faiths coming to know Christ. They have called out to God in the midst of the persecution they have endured due to the brutal ISIS regime. The team found that God had revealed himself in mighty ways in the midst of the dire conditions.

Dear Father,
The numbers seem overwhelming at times, but you know each individual refugee by name. Each person bears your image. Each child is loved by you. Open our eyes to their need and their potential. Soften our hearts to their suffering. Move us to action in ways that honor the love and compassion you have for each refugee. In the name of Christ, Amen.
(From Baptist Global Response; ©2017, Pray for Refugees)

Team: Debbie B., Elizabeth and Mary Michael Lipford, Ashley Larson

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Story by Ann Carter. Photos provided by the Surles family and Ann Carter.

I have plans for you.When we dedicate babies at Richmond’s First Baptist Church, we pledge with parents to help raise their children to know and love God with all their heart, mind, soul and strength. Pastor Jim Somerville asks parents to nurture their children’s faith, teaching them the songs and reading them the stories of Jesus, bringing them to church to learn about Jesus so when they are old enough, they can make the decision for themselves to choose Jesus. Jim asks the parents, “Are you willing to do your part?” “We will,” they respond. Jim then turns to the congregation, challenging us to do our part. And we answer with an enthusiastic “We will!”

Each baby is given a special verse, chosen by their parents, which will shape their faith journey. And sometimes, if we pay close enough attention, we have the great joy of watching the fruit of that commitment as these babies grow into amazing adults who have committed to live like Christ in lives of service.

callout

I have plans for you.Our church has most definitely kept its commitment with Madeline Surles and has had the joy of watching her grow from a tiny baby being dedicated on the steps of our sanctuary to the young woman she is today. And it is not only Maddie’s life, but her mother’s as well, that has been shaped by our community of faith. This summer was Maddie’s 15th mission trip with FBC and her sixth trip to Helena, Arkansas. It was Laurie’s first mission trip. Ever. I didn’t realize this until halfway through the week: “I have sent my daughter on mission trips ever since she was in the 7th grade, but I have never had the opportunity to go on one myself.”

I have plans for you.I have plans for you.Wait. What? Laurie had never been on a mission trip before? Nope. As a single mom, Laurie worked hard to get Maddie to church for all the children and youth activities our church offers—and all the extra events, too. She worked hard to make sure Maddie could attend trips the youth group went on each summer. Sometimes, there were additional ones like the BWA Youth Conferences in Germany and Singapore, the sports mission trip to China or service in Slovakia, Saint Croix and Manila. Laurie sacrificed to give her daughter all the opportunities she could; and because of these sacrifices, there wasn’t enough money or time off from work for Laurie to go. But in the meantime, her sacrifice paid off. While Maddie’s faith was being formed in her mind and in her heart, it was also being formed in her hands. Now that Maddie is an adult, living independently as she studies for her Master’s Degree at Bluefield College, it was time for Laurie to go. “I witnessed how these trips changed her life and I wanted to be a part of one. So when Maddie asked me to join her, I said ‘Yes!’”

Reflecting on her first mission trip, Laurie said, “The people who go on the Helena trip are part of Madeline’s family and the people who live in Helena are part of her family. I finally got to meet the people who were so special to her. Maddie has been able to go on so many mission trips and I have been able to hear about them afterwards. But this time, I got to see firsthand what she can do. I loved watching Maddie using her talents to serve God.”

I have plans for you.As Laurie spoke, her eyes filled with tears, “People in this church have been praying for my children since the day they were born.” And that has made all the difference. Parenting isn’t easy. We can’t do it alone. What a gift to have a community of faith that partners with parents to shape the lives of our children, so that they serve like Christ, wherever they go bringing the kingdom of heaven a little closer to earth.

 

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Story and photos by Candi Brown

Poverty in ParadisePoverty in ParadiseMission trips happen in many destinations for a variety of purposes. “How do you go about choosing a mission trip like St. Lucia?” is a question that Steve Blanchard was asked in a recent meeting. Although he went into greater detail, the answer is simple. We were asked by a Caribbean missionary, Pastor John Gilbert, from St. Croix to partner with Gospel Baptist Church, a church that cares deeply about its community and might benefit from the help of a ministry partner. Pastor Gilbert knew Richmond’s First Baptist Church and its congregation and felt that our church could assist them with resources and volunteers in many different types of ministry opportunities.

Poverty in ParadiseOur first experience nearly four years ago in St. Lucia was a simple one. We went there to build. We went to build relationships and help tear down an old fence and build a new one. Most people identify mission trips with humanitarian aid or traveling to countries where spreading the gospel message is a challenge. Our initial request was neither of these. It is a partnership mission. We went to begin a relationship of support which we hoped would help to better equip and empower Gospel Baptist to carry out the mission that God has called them to do in their community, which includes serving and loving their neighbors and sharing the love of Christ and the gospel message.

Poverty in ParadisePoverty in ParadiseAlthough none of us knew exactly what to expect, by laboring together for a week and worshiping together on Sunday, friendships grew. We fell in love with this beautiful island and its warm, hospitable people. Our conversations turned from fences and construction to other opportunities to partner together in the future. The following summer we returned to help with Vacation Bible School, the church’s largest outreach activity. We traveled with suitcases full of craft supplies, puppets, small prizes for children, and teaching materials. Our team performed puppet shows every day and assisted with preschool and elementary age classes. With an invitation from their leaders, we decided to return again for a second year of VBS. We increased our level of leadership and responsibilities. On our most recent trip in February 2017, a team of five volunteers assisted with construction of a new roof for the church. We also began a new outreach ministry at the local orphanage, where we spent an afternoon visiting staff and children and delivering three suitcases of supplies. We hope to continue to assist the orphanage on future trips.

Poverty in ParadiseThrough our partnership work, many FBC volunteers have developed deep friendships within the Gospel Baptist family. One of the unexpected blessings of this mission is the relationships built with the community in Rodney Bay where our team stays. Sustainable mission partnerships provide opportunities to do extended community outreach. Many faith conversations have taken place with people who work at the hotel, local restaurants, beach and shops due to our mission work and recurring stays within the community. Friendships that developed throughout the community have opened many doors for us to share our faith.

As a church family, you can partner with us as we continue to explore ways to reach St. Lucia and work with Gospel Baptist in Babonneau. We hope to continue our support for their VBS and outreach to children in their community and the orphanage. Their church leaders have asked us to consider providing a much-needed health clinic and eye exam clinic, in addition to leadership training for their church teachers and leaders. We look forward to seeing what God has planned for us over the next few years. You can provide support through prayer, becoming a team member, donating money or supplies and providing referrals for possible health professionals to assist in a future trip.

Yes, St. Lucia is a beautiful island in a paradise setting for mission work. But beyond the tourist areas are communities of people living in poverty. It is a blessing to work alongside Christian friends as they fulfill God’s calling to reach out in love to their community, sharing their faith and love of Christ.

Poverty in Paradise2017 Team members: Candi Brown, Team Leader; Tom and Teri Osborne; Franklin Hamilton and his wife, Linda Ringwood.

 

 

 

 

 


Candi BrownCandi Brown has served as Children’s Minister since 2007, directing the Preschool and Children’s Ministry and shaping spiritual formation of our children. She has led and participated in mission trips to Arkansas, Slovakia, China, Costa Rica, South Africa and St. Lucia. Candi and her husband, Matthew, have five children, Madison, Adam, Jonathan, Hassan and Husein.

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Story by Bart Dalton and Allie Osborne. Photos and video by Sean Cook and Bart Dalton.

A Tiny Bit of HeavenIn June 2016, a group of FBC’s youths, college students, and adult leaders embarked on a mission to change the lives of the homeless community in Nashville, TN. We were invited by Open Table Nashville to use our limited, but ambitious, carpentry skills and our hunger to help build three “tiny homes.” Once completed, these homes would become part of a larger housing neighborhood for homeless people.

Each home has a tiny bathroom, tiny kitchen, sitting area, bedroom loft, and tiny front porch. The houses are equipped with electricity and running water. However, these are not the most important aspects of the houses. Rather, they provide a way for homeless men and women to instantly become, well – non-homeless. These tiny houses are designed for people to reside in for one year and then move on to low-income housing. Open Table Nashville is dedicated to rehabilitating the homeless community. The most effective way to do this is to give them homes, with the expectation that they will re-enter society as stable participants.A Tiny Bit of Heaven

A Tiny Bit of HeavenIn the 2015-16 winter, 80 homeless people died in Nashville. They were not ill; they were not killed or harmed by others. They simply did not have access to shelter when the temperatures dropped and were forced to sleep outside. These 80 people did not wake up.

Heartbreaking statistics fueled our plans but a one-week timetable was just not enough to complete all three tiny homes. Our work turned out to be the foundation, literally and figuratively, for other groups to continue this ministry.

A Tiny Bit of HeavenAs with every mission trip, there was an aspect greater than the physical results. We did so much more than show up, help out for a week, and leave feeling good about our work. We were given the opportunity to work alongside the homeless, eat meals with them, and visit their shelters. Seeing so many in need and having the ability to do so little to help was a humbling and powerful experience. It was no longer the homeless community that needed our help. It was David and Helen and Steve, our friends, who were suffering. We saw their lives as more than a statistic and more than a stigma. This trip was special because it left us feeling broken for the people we met, and confident that God had used our group, and would continue to use other groups like us, to minister to, worship with, and love the homeless of Nashville.

A Tiny Bit of HeavenBack in RVA, we continue our ministry to the homeless. Steve Blanchard connected us, physically and spiritually, with our local homeless community. Using our new skills and thirst for this ministry, the FBC youths are leading ministry meetings with the homeless on Wednesday nights at the West Marshall Building in Scott’s Addition. We are building relationships with them through discussions, Bible study, worship, and games. With God’s direction, our youths’ ambitions, and FBC’s support, lives are being changed, and a tiny bit of Heaven has come to Nashville and Richmond.

View a video feature from the Nashville mission by Sean Cook.


Bart Dalton

Bart Dalton is the Minister to Students at First Baptist Church. He is married to Marianne, and they have two sons, Joey and Robbie. Bart believes that we learn and grow best when we work together and when we play together. He enjoys creating ways for students and parents to work side-by-side, and to play absolutely epic and mind-blowing games.

Allie Osborne

Allie Osborne, a student at Christopher Newport University, studies Communication with a concentration in Rhetorical Criticism. She grew up at FBC, where she was active in Youth 2 Sunday school, Choir and Girls’ Ensemble. In 2016 Allie served as a summer intern with the Youth Ministry; she looks forward to a future in ministry.

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Story by Ken Storey. Photos by Elizabeth Lipford and Ken Storey.

Love and Presence with Roma ChildrenHow do you work with Roma (also known as Gypsy) children? Vacation Bible School and Facebook are two ways, but love and presence are the foundations of this work. Golgotha Baptist Church in Bistrita, Romania, with its love and presence, developed an outreach program to the Roma people in and around their city. First Baptist Church’s love and presence traveled to Bistrita in the form of a team of adults and youth.

Love and Presence with Roma Children Love and Presence with Roma Children

The team had spent months planning their trip to Bistrita, an “old world” town where a typical worker makes the equivalent of $75 U.S. per week. As one translator told us, “We are the China of Europe; low wages, hard working.” This economy makes the area perfect for the Roma people, who are shunned in much of the rest of Europe.

Love and Presence with Roma Children Love and Presence with Roma Children

Love and Presence with Roma ChildrenBecause modern Romanian children are required to learn English by high school, Golgotha Baptist’s high school and college students translated for us. Perhaps more importantly, they served as Romanian Christian models to the children we worked with.

With five days, three locations, and 60-120 children in each location, we needed all the supplies we took with us and all our afternoons and evenings to prepare the crafts, stories, songs and games for the next day. Each day had a different focus: Jesus calming the storm, Jonah and the whale, David and Goliath, Naomi and Ruth, and Jesus’ resurrection.

Love and Presence with Roma Children Love and Presence with Roma Children We also used the afternoons to help Golgotha Baptist with maintenance of Camp Hope, where we stayed. Our jobs were cleaning and painting its building and grounds. Each evening Bart, Craig and the adult leaders led devotionals and analysis of the day: what worked, what didn’t, and what we could do better the next day.

During our 10 days in Romania, relationships formed through Vacation Bible School and now these relationships continue via Facebook. But those are just tools we use to make tangible what God’s message really is—love and presence.

Author’s note: Team leaders: Bart Dalton, FBC Minister to Students, and Craig Waddell, with Baptist General Association of Virginia Partnerships. Adult leaders: Tia Cochran, Elizabeth Lipford, Ken Storey; Youth Ministry Intern, Allie Osborne; youths: Ann Allred, Adam Brown, Madison Brown, Emily Hubbard, Sarah Jaramillo, Claire Johnson, Tara McKee, Christina Ramsey, Lydia and Will Storey.

Love and Presence with Roma Children

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Story by Annette Hall.
Photos provided by missionaries and volunteers in West Africa.

calloutWhen you gave to the World Hunger Fund/International Mission Board, your gifts helped purchase a flour mill in Burkina Faso (West Africa) that provides several small villages the means to grind their grain. The income from the mill pays the salaries of those who run it and also pays for a number of training and outreach efforts of the churches in the area.

Your gifts built a mill.Atio is one whose life has been changed because of the mill.

I am married and the mother of six children, four girls and two boys. My first name, Atio, means that I belong to a great idol known to everyone in the village. Since my youth I’ve worshipped this idol. But I never had peace in my heart. Four years ago things took a bad turn in my life. My husband fell seriously ill to the point that he could no longer work. Then I also fell sick. We spent all our savings searching for a solution to our problems. The witchdoctors said that the gods were angry with us. During the night I was unable to sleep.

One day I went to the village grinding mill and heard the story about Jesus calming the storm. That day I gave my life to Jesus. My husband let me tell him the story and he also gave his life to Jesus. Now (we) go together to the Baptist Church…

We are currently sharing the gospel with our sons and daughters hoping they will also choose the way of Jesus. Our health is getting better and better and we bless the Lord Jesus.

Your gifts built a mill.The pastor of the largest church in the area has attended trainings to learn how to craft and tell more than 100 Bible stories in his heart language. He has also helped train believers to use these stories for evangelism and church planting. His team’s goal is to put a trained story teller in each village in the area. The team also wants to send pairs of story tellers to villages with no church to plant churches there. He shares an example of how his team carries out its goals.

While women wait to grind their grain at the mill, team members tell them Bible stories. One day they told the story of the paralytic to about 30 women, who all listened intently. At the end, the story teller asked them the following seven questions:
What did you like in the story?
What bothered you in the story?
What did you learn about God in the story?
What did you learn about people in the story?
Is there something in the story you should obey?
How will you remember the story?
To whom will you tell the story?
When the last question was asked, three of the women gave the only correct answer – they said they were going to return to their village and tell it to their chief!

They did just that. The chief then summoned the story-telling women from the mill and invited all the royal family, as well as his neighbors. When the team told the story again, they were asked for another story. Then they told the story of the Demoniac.

When the chief and his family heard this story, they decided to follow Jesus, and the chief invited the team to put a church in his village. One hundred and three adults worshiped at the first church service. Three young men are being trained in the stories so the work there will continue and grow.

Baptist Global Response is the arm of the International Mission Board that distributes your World Hunger Funds. The funds are used to relieve hunger but as you see from these stories, the funds also bring a spiritual element. Because you gave, these people had the chance to grind their grain and improve their lives. They also had the opportunity to hear God’s Word in the way they could understand and respond.

Baptist Global Response Hunger SundayEditor’s note: On World Hunger Sunday, October 9, 2016, and on any other Sunday, use your gold offering envelope in your packet or in the pew racks. Designate your gift for:
Disaster & Hunger (Baptist World Aid, BWAid) and/or
Disaster & Hunger (Southern Baptist Convention, Global Response).

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Photos by Franklin Hamilton and Shannon Harton

Jon Parks, Cooperative Baptist Fellowship field personnel, Roma Ministry in Slovakia

Voices from CroatiaIt was a test case for unmet expectations. This group had come to Croatia, sacrificing their time and their own resources to volunteer at the refugee center. Of course they had expectations of what they’d be doing, who they’d be helping. In the face of uncertain events, we almost always create some idea for ourselves of what might happen, just to help us deal with the uncertainty.

I didn’t know this group ahead of time, so I didn’t get to ask them about their expectations. But I watched as they dealt with the differences in their expectations and their reality. The reality was chaotic – there was a lot of waiting, a lot of changed plans, a lot of previously unthought-of ways of serving. But as an outsider I watched as they adapted themselves – sometimes with frustration, but finally with joy – to doing the unexpected things that God had for them to do.

Voices from CroatiaTo be honest, these folks from Virginia were primed for a unique opportunity. Most everyone at the center – police, Red Cross, translators – had a specific job to do, and it was easy for them to run back and forth doing the things they perceived were important… sometimes missing deeper human needs that a simple bag of food wouldn’t address. These people came with open eyes and ears and were able to see – and meet – the needs others were missing.

• A gentle touch for mothers, frightened for their children’s safety.
• A smile for people shuffling nervously between one country and another.
• A helping hand to gather all the little packets and clothes they’d been given.
• A thanks and a cup of coffee for policewomen and men, always on edge, wondering how to respond if things got out of hand.

When we are PRESENT, when we open our eyes and hearts to what is really needed around us, we’re in a unique place to help.

Voices from Croatia
Ann Carter, First Baptist Church (FBC) staff, Youth One Associate
Voices from CroatiaThe night shift is the place to be. During the day, scores of volunteers from Croatia and NGOs are in the camps, but few work the dark and lonely hours.

At about 1 a.m., we head into sector 3 which is filled to capacity (over 1,000 people).The train will arrive sometime in the night, no one knows when. So while the police protect the sector and the Red Cross mans the supplies, our team makes friends. Often the women and the children are in the tents asleep while the men stand guard outside. Our team pairs up and walks among the tents, smiling, saying good evening, asking if they have everything they need. Sometimes, the words go from pleasantries, answering a few questions and wishing them Godspeed to deep and meaningful conversations.

Voices from CroatiaWe made some friends: Mohammad from Syria; Hamza, also from Syria, traveling alone with his 8-year-old son; Sami, from Lebanon, traveling with his wife and 5 children – three girls and two boys, ages 2-10; Osama, from Syria, traveling with his pregnant wife. We hear harrowing stories of escape and what life was like for them at home – bombs falling on houses, family and friends imprisoned, children who can’t go to school for fear they may not come home. They talk about their families left behind and the ones who have already gotten out. They talk about businesses lost, education unfinished, the lack of work, hiding from snipers in their neighborhoods, about how they would go back in a minute if Assad were defeated and Isis and Hezbollah left their countries.

Voices from CroatiaWhen we hear the train whistle in the distance, everyone immediately lines up. With the crowd pushing ahead and the police pushing back, people are crushed and panicked. Our job is to try to form a single-file line. In the confusion, I lost my new friends but finally spot Sami and his family. The beauty and absolute sweetness of his children take my breath away. I stand with their few small bags as they take the children to the bathroom one last time. The mother pulls out hats and mittens, and I help little fingers into gloves while Sami puts hats on small heads, topping each with a kiss. We say goodbye amid blowing kisses and calls of “God bless you” and “Barak Allah fik!” (May Allah bless you!) I stand there and watch the police load them onto the train. There are no seats left. They must sit in the stairwell, clutching their knees to their chests to be out of the way as the door closes. They have a 6-hour train ride to Slovenia; then to Austria and Germany. Maybe Germany will let them stay? No one knows. And since they are from Lebanon, they aren’t really “war refugees.” Will their journey be in vain? Will they be sent back? I stand with tears streaming down my face until the train leaves, praying for their future and their safety. How could I have grown to love them so in only two hours?

Shannon Harton, FBC member

Voices from CroatiaThe last train out: after two hours of “processing,” our last trainload of refugees – 1200 of them – were on their way north.

We stayed busy this week distributing packs of essentials, sorting clothes, handing out hot tea, guiding families to their temporary quarters, stooping to make friendly eye contact with kids. It’s nearly impossible though to quantify the impact we had, other than the odd opportunity to run to the warehouse to replace a kid’s tattered shoes, to get a smile from an exhausted teenager loaded down with duffle bags and trudging to keep up with his family, or to squeeze in a few moments of friendly conversation to make a worried father feel more optimistic about his kids’ future. But as the train rolled out of the camp under the dawn sky – the last train we get to serve before heading home tonight – the smiles, waves and blown kisses from the windows make it clear that we scored at least a glancing blow against misery.

Franklin Hamilton, FBC member

Voices from CroatiaThe story of the lost shoe began one day in the refugee camp. There were an unusually large number of families with small children, 100s of them. As they rushed to get on the train, the children strained to keep up and some parents ran ahead to be sure their family could all be together in the same train car. I found this shoe on the train track long after the train had left. At first I thought it was a new shoe donated by the Red Cross. But as I looked more closely at the worn straps and the national colors of Syria, I saw stamped on the sole Made In SYR.

This shoe has become a religious icon reminding me of all the little children who have been swept away from their homes by war and hate.


Team members
FBC members: Steve Blanchard, Ann Carter, Jeff Dortch, Franklin Hamilton, Shannon and Heather Harton, Lori Humrich, and Lisa Tuck. Also on the team were Brent Kimlick (Franklin Baptist Church, Franklin, VA), and Jon Parks (CBF missionary).

Related video and blogs
Praying with our Feet, Spotting Jesus–Born on the Run” blog by Jon Parks
Brief Croatian refugee train video by Shannon Harton
Holding Space… Living with Arms Wide Open blog by Ann Carter
A little more like heaven”–VA Baptists Serve in a Croatian Refugee Camp
“Living with Arms Wide Open” sermon by Ann Carter

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