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Posts Tagged ‘Easter’

By Lynn Turner

I called Nancy Pettigrew, Prayer team chair of Richmond’s First Baptist Church, the week the church was closed to the public and said, “Nancy, this means we will not be able to do our Stations of the Cross in the Chapel during Holy Week as we have done the past three years. How do you feel about moving it outside?” She was thrilled!

Stations of the Cross 2020: A Sacred JourneyI met with Allen Cumbia, Ruth Szucs, Jack Pettigrew and Jeff Dortch to figure out how it might work. Jeff built the crosses, Jack made all the signs, and Allen Cumbia and Karen DeMarino went to work on creating a method to use QR codes (Quick Response Codes, the bar created with symbols to read information) that would access our narration for each station. I began working on the script for the narration and Allen brought in our staff one at a time to record it. Clint Smith and Alice Brette worked to create a page on our church website with the recordings for those without a QR code reader app on their phones or who chose to journey through the stations at home.

Karen DeMarino offered to make the drapes for the Celtic cross near our chapel that would represent the end of the journey. Richard Szucs and David Carter volunteered to weed and get the courtyard gardens in tiptop shape. It looked beautiful!

It was definitely a team effort!

Why was it important to find a way to make this a part of our Holy Week experience?

Throughout scripture, in both the Old and New Testaments, God’s people are called to remember. But we are not called to remember events for the sake of the event. We are called to remember because the events we learn about from scripture form a part of our own journey with Christ. During our celebration of Easter, the Stations of the Cross become markers for us of the journey Jesus made during the last hours of his life on earth. It begins with the Hall of Pilate and continues until that fateful death on Calvary. Some traditions mark 14 stations to the cross, while protestants have typically chosen the eight stations that are most represented in the Gospels. Walking the stations to the cross allows us to identify with Jesus as he identifies with us. We are drawn to contemplate, not only the suffering and pain of our own journey mirrored in His, but as we follow Christ, we are compelled to identify with those around us who suffer in their own journey.

The result? A blessing for all who walked our garden during the week and experienced the reality of the journey Christ made on his way to Calvary. There is no way to tell how many experienced this in our community, but the emails and Facebook comments tell us that it was meaningful for them. Many asked, “Can we do it like this again next year?” Well yes…yes, we can! And with the help of the same team of folks who made it possible, we are hopeful that is exactly what we will do next year when we are not in quarantine.

If you were not able to come in person this year, I hope you will make plans next year during Holy Week 2021 to experience this sacred journey with us.

Note: The Stations of the Cross we celebrate begin with the Hall of Pilate, a marker representing Pilate condemning Jesus to die on the cross. The next station represents Christ accepting the cross, followed by the station remembering Simon who helped Christ by carrying the cross for him. Station four represents Jesus speaking to the women who stood at the foot of the cross. The next station symbolizes Jesus being stripped of his garments, followed by the marker reminding us that he was nailed to the cross. Station seven characterizes Jesus caring for his mother by asking his disciple to treat Mary as his own mother. Finally, station eight marks Jesus’ death on the cross.

View the brief video about Stations of the Cross produced by Rodney Macklin and Allen Cumbia.

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How to keep on living the good and beautiful lifeBy Jim Somerville.

During the Season of Lent, the members and friends of Richmond’s First Baptist Church studied a book called The Good and Beautiful Life, by James Bryan Smith. Some of them met in homes, some in Sunday school classes, some came to the Journey to the Cross services, and some did all of the above.  It was a powerful community-building exercise, and I think we all learned a great deal.

So, now what?

The original plan was this: that we would spend the Season of Lent learning about the Good and Beautiful Life, that we would spend the Season of Easter living the Good and Beautiful Life, and then spend the Season of Pentecost sharing the Good and Beautiful Life.

Learning, living, sharing.  Got it?

According to that plan we are now in the Great Fifty Days of the Easter season (April 5 through May 23), the season of living the life.  But how do we do that?  Or, rather, how do we keep on doing it?

Here’s one suggestion:

The Good and Beautiful Life is essentially a study of the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5-7.  James Bryan Smith’s premise is that in these chapters Jesus explains what life in God’s kingdom looks like and what it would take to live it.  The life of the kingdom is the good and beautiful life, Smith argues, and if we could learn to do what Jesus says we would know that.

So, try this.

In the remainder of this season, all the way up to May 24, the Day of Pentecost, try reading the Sermon on the Mount as a kind of daily devotion.  If you’re reading this on your computer, you can simply click HERE and go to a page that has the whole sermon waiting for you in the New Revised Standard Version.  Click that same link tomorrow and try reading it in a different version, the Message, or the NIV.  Maybe you could read a different version every day, just to keep it fresh.

My hope is this: that if you saturate yourself in that sermon, if you sink down into its message day after day, you will begin to live the life it describes.  You will trust God more.  You will hate others less.  You will pluck up the seed of sin before it can take root.  You will know that you are blessed.  You will be like the one who built his house on a rock.

Try it!  Live it!  And then get ready to share it.

A life like this will be too good and beautiful to keep to yourself.

 This post originally appeared in JimsBlog, the Pastor’s blog, on April 13, 2015.

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Photos by Susan Brown.

Less than ideal weather was not a game stopper for Richmond’s annual Easter Parade. Since 2009 Candi Brown, FBC’s Minister to Children, has organized and led activities for kids and parents – puppet shows, music, yard games, and games with prizes such as necklaces, Easter books, candy, hats, and pinwheels. Easter 2013’s rain kept the scale smaller, but the fun was just as big.

Monument Avenue Easter on Paradeeaster-pinwheelseaster-wheelgameeaster-bubbleeaster-tosseaster-toss2easter-toss3easter-peggameeaster-bubble2easter-hoopgame Monument Avenue Easter on Parade

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