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Posts Tagged ‘Halloween’

Story by Dr. Terry Whipple

It’s a great, traditional holiday, especially for youngsters. Halloween stands for All Hallows’ Evening, the evening before All Hallows’ Feast Day. The feast day marks the beginning, for Christians, of All Hallows’ Tide, three days dedicated to the remembrance and honor of the dead, especially the saints. Hence the theme of ghosts carries into the celebration of Halloween, and the treats mimic the Feast Day.

eating-halloween-candy300pxSo what does this mean for us, practically speaking? Do we participate in the liturgical celebration of saints? Do we pray fervently and light candles for the dearly departed? Actually we tend to costume up, party down, and snitch the candy our kids bring back from Trick or Treating. Interesting…maybe that should be Treat or Tricking, because the treats can easily become tricks.

Who cares about A1c, the calculated code for the three-month average blood sugar in our hemoglobin? We do…or should! There are 29 million Americans with diabetes, a rampant and debilitating disease with widespread, serious complications. And there are another 89 million with prediabetes, a condition that occurs when A1c approaches 6.0. Diabetes is most prevalent in those over 65 years of age and affects one-fourth of that population. Shouldn’t we be aware of our A1c and the risk? After all, diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death and costs some $250 billion per year in healthcare in America.

Think about that as those innocent, idle calories slip down the throat at Halloween, or Halloweatin’. Will that help or play tricks on our blood sugar and our ideal weight? How about an apple instead?


Terry Whipple

Terry L. Whipple, MD, known as “Dr. T,” launched The Physician Within medical education mission at FBC with the support of Dr. Somerville and the church staff in 2008. Dr. T specializes in sports medicine, hand surgery and joint replacement. He has 15 surgical patents and has published many medical articles. He has degrees from Princeton and  UVA medical school. He was a Navy flight surgeon and enjoys risky sports and teaching bed-side manner and ethics.

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