Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mission trips’

Story and photos by Candi Brown

Poverty in ParadisePoverty in ParadiseMission trips happen in many destinations for a variety of purposes. “How do you go about choosing a mission trip like St. Lucia?” is a question that Steve Blanchard was asked in a recent meeting. Although he went into greater detail, the answer is simple. We were asked by a Caribbean missionary, Pastor John Gilbert, from St. Croix to partner with Gospel Baptist Church, a church that cares deeply about its community and might benefit from the help of a ministry partner. Pastor Gilbert knew Richmond’s First Baptist Church and its congregation and felt that our church could assist them with resources and volunteers in many different types of ministry opportunities.

Poverty in ParadiseOur first experience nearly four years ago in St. Lucia was a simple one. We went there to build. We went to build relationships and help tear down an old fence and build a new one. Most people identify mission trips with humanitarian aid or traveling to countries where spreading the gospel message is a challenge. Our initial request was neither of these. It is a partnership mission. We went to begin a relationship of support which we hoped would help to better equip and empower Gospel Baptist to carry out the mission that God has called them to do in their community, which includes serving and loving their neighbors and sharing the love of Christ and the gospel message.

Poverty in ParadisePoverty in ParadiseAlthough none of us knew exactly what to expect, by laboring together for a week and worshiping together on Sunday, friendships grew. We fell in love with this beautiful island and its warm, hospitable people. Our conversations turned from fences and construction to other opportunities to partner together in the future. The following summer we returned to help with Vacation Bible School, the church’s largest outreach activity. We traveled with suitcases full of craft supplies, puppets, small prizes for children, and teaching materials. Our team performed puppet shows every day and assisted with preschool and elementary age classes. With an invitation from their leaders, we decided to return again for a second year of VBS. We increased our level of leadership and responsibilities. On our most recent trip in February 2017, a team of five volunteers assisted with construction of a new roof for the church. We also began a new outreach ministry at the local orphanage, where we spent an afternoon visiting staff and children and delivering three suitcases of supplies. We hope to continue to assist the orphanage on future trips.

Poverty in ParadiseThrough our partnership work, many FBC volunteers have developed deep friendships within the Gospel Baptist family. One of the unexpected blessings of this mission is the relationships built with the community in Rodney Bay where our team stays. Sustainable mission partnerships provide opportunities to do extended community outreach. Many faith conversations have taken place with people who work at the hotel, local restaurants, beach and shops due to our mission work and recurring stays within the community. Friendships that developed throughout the community have opened many doors for us to share our faith.

As a church family, you can partner with us as we continue to explore ways to reach St. Lucia and work with Gospel Baptist in Babonneau. We hope to continue our support for their VBS and outreach to children in their community and the orphanage. Their church leaders have asked us to consider providing a much-needed health clinic and eye exam clinic, in addition to leadership training for their church teachers and leaders. We look forward to seeing what God has planned for us over the next few years. You can provide support through prayer, becoming a team member, donating money or supplies and providing referrals for possible health professionals to assist in a future trip.

Yes, St. Lucia is a beautiful island in a paradise setting for mission work. But beyond the tourist areas are communities of people living in poverty. It is a blessing to work alongside Christian friends as they fulfill God’s calling to reach out in love to their community, sharing their faith and love of Christ.

Poverty in Paradise2017 Team members: Candi Brown, Team Leader; Tom and Teri Osborne; Franklin Hamilton and his wife, Linda Ringwood.

 

 

 

 

 


Candi BrownCandi Brown has served as Children’s Minister since 2007, directing the Preschool and Children’s Ministry and shaping spiritual formation of our children. She has led and participated in mission trips to Arkansas, Slovakia, China, Costa Rica, South Africa and St. Lucia. Candi and her husband, Matthew, have five children, Madison, Adam, Jonathan, Hassan and Husein.

Read Full Post »

Story by Allen Brown. Photos by Allen Cumbia, Win Grant and Allison Maxwell.

Easy to Follow His CallOn February 12, 2015 Becky Payne completed 25 years of extraordinary ministry as a member of the staff at Richmond’s First Baptist Church. During that time she has served as organist, soloist, children’s choir coordinator, accompanist for choirs, ensembles and soloists, advisor for senior adults, handbell choir director and ringer, and organizer and director of the JoySingers and the Youth Girls’ Ensemble. Becky has taken additional responsibility for many mission trips and choir tours and for a long-running Bible class for FBC members who live at Lakewood Manor.

In a recent interview Becky shared about her ministry at FBC.

Leaving First Baptist Church, Jackson, Mississippi, a place where you served happily and successfully for 11 years, was a major step for you, personally and professionally.

Yes, but for me the call of God was to “go.” I saw it not as a “leaving” but a “going.” Believing fully in God’s faithfulness, I found it easy to follow His call.

What are some memories of those early years at First Baptist?

becky-friends_350pxThe surprise of renovation. I had left a church which had just finished a major renovation, then learned that we were to do the same here. The renovation process causes big adjustments for an organist and accompanist. Also, I remember that it took time to balance staff responsibilities, each finding our niche and then finding ways to support each other.

Then there was the surprise of process, finding that the pace of most everything was much slower, especially in church life. In my previous church, things happened quickly and, other than scheduling, without needing the approval of deacons or committees.

Other vivid memories include the illness and subsequent death of our senior pastor’s son. The love and support shown to their family by FBC people told me so much about my new church home. (Dr. James Flamming was pastor from 1983 to 2006. His son Dave died in 1991, a year after Becky’s arrival.)

In your many roles since you arrived, what have been the most meaningful personal and spiritual parts of your ministry?
Worship and relationships. When I am using music to help people feel the presence of God, it is fulfilling. When the people sing “Worthy of Worship” or “Amazing Grace,” for instance, these become holy moments for the church family. But it is not about me—God is using my hands and feet and talents to glorify Him—to point people toward Him.

Personal relationships have been so important, especially walking through difficult times with someone. One of my spiritual gifts is discernment. I can feel the pain and share in the difficult but special process of walking with them.

Tell us some warm memories or “aha” moments.
becky-directing_350pxThere are at least three music moments that are special. One is our congregational singing of “The Lord’s Prayer” after communion. Another is when we sing “Silent Night” on Christmas Eve. Those two moments make me fully aware of what it means to be a part of the body of Christ and the power we share in that relationship.

The third is when the Youth Girls’ Ensemble sang “Blessings.” The phrase “what if the trials of this life are blessings in disguise…” When I selected music for the Ensemble, I looked for text more than melody. As they practiced, they sang the words over and over. For this piece they internalized a great truth: If we let Him, God uses what happens in our lives for good. I was glad to be part of their learning this lesson.

One memorable personal event occurred after I had been here about 10 years. I was driving home from a conference and realized for the first time that I felt I was coming home. This was my place and still is.

How do you feel about your work with seniors?
When I was new to Richmond, I met the Wendy Bunch (a small group of couples who met on Sunday nights after church, first at Wendy’s, then in homes) – the Seldens, the Dixons, the Shearons, the Harringtons, the Lucys, the Elmores, and others. They embraced me with such love and care that I knew I was in the right place.

As my work with seniors grew and became a significant part of my ministry, I found my life enriched on every level. We have studied together, laughed and played together, prayed together, grieved and celebrated together. Our senior adults are the heart of this church. I love them.

You’ve gone on several mission trips. How have they changed you?
beckywithchild_350pxI was a Sunbeam and a GA (Baptist missions organizations for children), and I had a missions-minded mother, so of course I’ve always had a desire to see God’s world and His people. But nothing could have prepared me for what I experienced in Germany and Indonesia.

In Essen, Germany, I learned what it felt like to be considered part of a cult (how many Germans view Baptists). That sense of separation was overcome as I watched a young girl weeping when she sang “Fairest Lord Jesus” in German while some of us sang in English. I realized anew that God is everywhere and that we serve the same God. And I have lasting friendships with members of our host church there.

The two trips to Indonesia were medical missions. It was a life-changing experience to be among people who had lived through a tsunami, who had never seen a doctor or white people. Many of them walked for hours to wait all day, hoping to be treated. Yet there were always more than we could possibly see each day.

Despite that disappointment, blessings abounded. Indonesia is a place where I should have been afraid, but I wasn’t. I witnessed a miracle as our group prayed for a girl who was obviously demon-possessed, and we saw her healed. Also, relationships among team members were deepened. We became more accessible and more important to each other as we recognized a new meaning in being brothers and sisters in Christ.

You are truly ministering to us through your exceptional instrumental and vocal skills. Tell us your feelings about this.
My calling is to teach others about the love of God through Christ Jesus. Music is the means, not the end. My abilities are God’s gift to me and He has been generous. I believe the greatest ability is availability—to be willing to use what God has given me to point others toward Him.

Editor’s note:
Becky’s last day as FBC’s organist will be June 28. She will retire on June 30, 2015.
View a video about Becky produced by Sean Cook and Allen Cumbia.


Allen BrownAllen Brown was Minister of Music in Baptist churches in North Carolina and Virginia, before becoming Director, Department of Church Music, at the Virginia Baptist General Board, from 1962 until his retirement in 1993. He has served the Music Ministry of Richmond’s First Baptist in many ways, including as a member of the search team that brought Becky Payne to FBC. He has been on Partnership Mission trips to Brazil, Germany, Slovakia and India. Allen and his wife, Charlotte, have two sons, four grandchildren, and two great grandchildren.

Read Full Post »