Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘reflecting God’

Story by Ann Carter.

Reflecting God OnlineSocial media has a bad reputation these days as a place where political opinions and personal insults are hurled with a lack of respect and downright cruelty, where you are shouted at for posting what you think and where you can’t tell real news from fake news. Many people I know are taking a break from social media because they can’t stand the hate and the vitriol. And I can’t blame them. Some days I have a hard time reading my newsfeeds. But I won’t give it up. You see, I love social media. It is where I connect with friends I have made from every stage of my life and every place I have lived and traveled. It is where I find interesting newspaper articles and blogs and daily devotions. It is where I watch a giraffe waiting to give birth. It is absolutely the best on my birthday when I get literally hundreds of birthday wishes. What’s not to love? Oh yeah, the political posts. But you know what? I think social media has great value in our society today—even with the political posts. “Why?” you may ask. Because it is a place where community happens; a place where people of different views can show up in my news feed and get equal reading time; a place where we can be called to action as well as called to encourage or pray or comfort; a place where we can share our joys and our sorrows and be joined in our grief and celebrations.

Reflecting God Online

Ann Carter

In January 2016, I was asked to take over the social media accounts of Richmond’s First Baptist Church. I gladly said “yes” because I love being on social media. First of all, it gives me the perfect excuse to be on social media. You know, “I have to be on here for work!” But seriously, just about everyone else in the world has a voice in social media and the church needs one too.

What is the purpose of church social media platforms? I believe there are three main purposes. First of all, social media can inform our congregants about what is happening at church. Second, it can provide an avenue of invitation to our neighbors for events that may be of interest to them such as the Church Choir Concert, Upward Basketball or The Physician Within. Third, and I believe most importantly, it is a place where we are the presence of Christ.

I believe the church should be the voice of peace and justice and hope and love in our broken and polarized world. Many churches are just that for the people who come in their doors and sit in their pews. But what about people who don’t come into our buildings and sit in our pews? How are they going to hear words of hope in their times of despair? How are they going to feel the loving presence of God in a world filled with hateful, judgmental words? How are they going to experience peace in the midst of so much political and social conflict? How are they going to know a just God in an unjust world? And so as I administer our social media, I try to capture moments when our church reflects a God of hope and peace and love. I try to capture God at work in our world through the people of FBC. I try to invite people into the adventure of serving God with us. I try to highlight where God is at work in our world through people outside of Richmond’s First Baptist Church—good things are happening all around us if we only take the time to look!

But I don’t need to be the Social Media Associate for a church in order to do these things. I can do them through my own personal social media accounts.  I can be the voice of peace and justice and hope and love in my own world. I can give grace-filled answers to my friends who disagree with me. My social media accounts can reflect a God of peace and hope and love and a God at work in our world. And so can yours.

Meredith Gould, Ph.D., is a digital strategist for churches. In her book, The Social Media Gospel, she shows how our faith provides a framework for using social media. I want to highlight a few of her points:

“Believing in a gracious and merciful God calls us to be gracious and merciful during online interactions.”

She also says that “believing in Gospel teachings calls us to model what we believe while using social media by offering helpful information, providing comfort, sharing joy and engaging in conversations that build and unite, rather than tear down or divide the people of God.”

And in 2010, Gould created this contemporary take on Saint Teresa of Avila’s prayer, “Christ Has No Body”:

Christ has no online presence but yours,
No blog, no Facebook page but yours,
Yours are the tweets through which love touches this world,
Yours are the posts through which the Gospel is shared,
You are the updates through which hope is revealed.
Christ has no online presence but yours,
No blog, no Facebook page but yours.

This is what guides me as I post both on the church’s social media and on my own. And I hope it can guide you as you evaluate your own social media presence. May our social media pages be used to touch the world with God’s love. Amen.


Here are a few of our most popular Facebook posts:

Reflecting God OnlineJune 19, 2016 – the youth leaving on their mission trips: Ahhhh… I love this image; the doors of our church flung open and all of us spilling out to go be the hands and feet of Christ wherever we find ourselves in our world.

Reflecting God OnlineJuly 14, 2016 – This picture was snapped in the pool in Helena, Arkansas where a team from Richmond’s First Baptist Church has been serving this week. I was immediately struck by the beauty and the power of this image – especially in light of the recent racial tension our nation is facing. Let this image inspire to us open our hands and our hearts, reaching toward one another in love, as we venture into the waters of reconciliation.

Reflecting God OnlineNov. 9, 2016 – A prayer for whatever it is you are feeling this post-election morning. And now…Church, let’s go be the presence of Christ wherever we find ourselves today. And tomorrow. And the day after that. And for all the days.

Reflecting God Online

April 16, 2017 – Christ is risen indeed! Hallelujah!

Read Full Post »