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Posts Tagged ‘Stations of the Cross’

By Lynn Turner

I called Nancy Pettigrew, Prayer team chair of Richmond’s First Baptist Church, the week the church was closed to the public and said, “Nancy, this means we will not be able to do our Stations of the Cross in the Chapel during Holy Week as we have done the past three years. How do you feel about moving it outside?” She was thrilled!

Stations of the Cross 2020: A Sacred JourneyI met with Allen Cumbia, Ruth Szucs, Jack Pettigrew and Jeff Dortch to figure out how it might work. Jeff built the crosses, Jack made all the signs, and Allen Cumbia and Karen DeMarino went to work on creating a method to use QR codes (Quick Response Codes, the bar created with symbols to read information) that would access our narration for each station. I began working on the script for the narration and Allen brought in our staff one at a time to record it. Clint Smith and Alice Brette worked to create a page on our church website with the recordings for those without a QR code reader app on their phones or who chose to journey through the stations at home.

Karen DeMarino offered to make the drapes for the Celtic cross near our chapel that would represent the end of the journey. Richard Szucs and David Carter volunteered to weed and get the courtyard gardens in tiptop shape. It looked beautiful!

It was definitely a team effort!

Why was it important to find a way to make this a part of our Holy Week experience?

Throughout scripture, in both the Old and New Testaments, God’s people are called to remember. But we are not called to remember events for the sake of the event. We are called to remember because the events we learn about from scripture form a part of our own journey with Christ. During our celebration of Easter, the Stations of the Cross become markers for us of the journey Jesus made during the last hours of his life on earth. It begins with the Hall of Pilate and continues until that fateful death on Calvary. Some traditions mark 14 stations to the cross, while protestants have typically chosen the eight stations that are most represented in the Gospels. Walking the stations to the cross allows us to identify with Jesus as he identifies with us. We are drawn to contemplate, not only the suffering and pain of our own journey mirrored in His, but as we follow Christ, we are compelled to identify with those around us who suffer in their own journey.

The result? A blessing for all who walked our garden during the week and experienced the reality of the journey Christ made on his way to Calvary. There is no way to tell how many experienced this in our community, but the emails and Facebook comments tell us that it was meaningful for them. Many asked, “Can we do it like this again next year?” Well yes…yes, we can! And with the help of the same team of folks who made it possible, we are hopeful that is exactly what we will do next year when we are not in quarantine.

If you were not able to come in person this year, I hope you will make plans next year during Holy Week 2021 to experience this sacred journey with us.

Note: The Stations of the Cross we celebrate begin with the Hall of Pilate, a marker representing Pilate condemning Jesus to die on the cross. The next station represents Christ accepting the cross, followed by the station remembering Simon who helped Christ by carrying the cross for him. Station four represents Jesus speaking to the women who stood at the foot of the cross. The next station symbolizes Jesus being stripped of his garments, followed by the marker reminding us that he was nailed to the cross. Station seven characterizes Jesus caring for his mother by asking his disciple to treat Mary as his own mother. Finally, station eight marks Jesus’ death on the cross.

View the brief video about Stations of the Cross produced by Rodney Macklin and Allen Cumbia.

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